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A One Diving Team

Thailand And Myanmar Dive Trips Based In Ranong, Thailand




Myanmar Dive Sites

The Mergui Archipelago and the remote Burmese Banks are today the "must" for every serious sea lover. Myanmar opened its rich waters to foreigners in 1997, after a closed period of over 50 years. More than 800 islands are scattered on 3600 km2, waiting for exploration. Some of them are inhabited by the sea-gypsies that once were the sole population of the Siam's West Coast, the only people you may see during your trip.

A few dive shops operate the Burmese waters. So just imagine: underwater, untouched reefs, no boat engine to tear your ears apart, no curtains of bubbles to obstruct your vision; at the surface, deserted beaches, fishing villages, amazing rock formations? Do not miss this unique opportunity to explore truly non-crowded sites. You'll be cruise a long lost archipelago, one of the last.

Myanmar Packages.

Package M1

Mergui Archipelago without Black Rock - "See Itinerary."

Mergui archipelago: Western Rocky, Twin Island & Shark Cave

  • 6
    days
  • 5
    nights
  • 18
    dives
  • Schedule

Package Departure Date Arrival Date Price Booking

Package M2

Mergui Archipelago with Black Rock - "See Itinerary."

Mergui archipelago: Black Rock, Western Rocky, Twin Island & Shark Cave

  • 7
    days
  • 6
    nights
  • 22
    dives
  • Schedule

Package Departure Date Arrival Date Price Booking

There are many of beautiful dive spot in the archipelago. Among them following spot are our favorite dive sites in this region;

Mergui Archipelago

The Mergui Archipelago is an archipelago in far southern Myanmar (Burma) and is part of the Tanintharyi Region. It consists of more than 800 islands, varying in size from very small to hundreds of square kilometres, all lying in the Andaman Sea off the western shore of the Malay Peninsula near its landward (northern) end where it joins the rest of Indochina. Occasionally the islands are referred to as the Pashu Islands because the Malay inhabitants are locally called Pashu.

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